TV SHOW: The WHISTLEBLOWER on Fri nights on CBS 5/2019

FYI – TV  show on Fri. nights at 8:00 CBS. (Chicago time) WHISTLEBLOWER –
First segment was about children and a dental chain. One child died under their care.  The second segment was about how drug companies treat their salespeople with special perks to promote their drugs – sometimes even tho they are not necessary.  Loved this show- it is on every Fri.   ALICE
In the series premiere, airing tonight at 8/7c, Ferrer introduces people who blew the whistle on pediatric dental chain Kool Smiles. The former employees believe unsafe practices were used on young patients.   “I lived in fear every day … what I would face,” says Dr. Rai.

“I was scared. Did I think something might happen? You never know when money’s involved,” says Dr.  Michael Greenwald.

It’s David vs. Goliath. “It’s a huge corporation. The intimidation is there,” says Rai.

Kool Smiles is a massive nationwide corporation with more than 120 clinics catering to kids.

“I was a dentist and I saw … unnecessary procedures, children being traumatized,” says Rai. “I was stressed to my eyeballs.”

They’re taking advantage of little kids,” says Greenwald. “They were doing baby root canals on teeth that could’ve had regular fillings.”

“I would hear children crying at work. All day,” Rai tells Ferrer.

An online job posting caught the eye of Greenwald.

“Kool Smiles typically targeted … recipients of Medicaid,” he explains. “I thought it was just, wow, this is a great idea. We’re treating children. …They’re underserved. We’re gonna do some good.”  Unlike Greenwald, who had 30 years of dentistry under his belt, Kool Smiles recruits were mostly young, inexperienced dentists and recent immigrants. Dr. Rai was one of them.

“It was a dream job,” she says.  “What did they offer you as a starting salary?” Ferrer asks. “The total package was $180, 000,”Rai replies.

“I was a dentist and I saw … unnecessary procedures, children being traumatized,” says Rai. “I was stressed to my eyeballs.”  They’re taking advantage of little kids,” says Greenwald. “They were doing baby root canals on teeth that could’ve had regular fillings.”

“I would hear children crying at work. All day,” Rai tells Ferrer.  An online job posting caught the eye of Greenwald.  “Kool Smiles typically targeted … recipients of Medicaid,” he explains. “I thought it was just, wow, this is a great idea. We’re treating children. …They’re underserved. We’re gonna do some good.”

Unlike Greenwald, who had 30 years of dentistry under his belt, Kool Smiles recruits were mostly young, inexperienced dentists and recent immigrants. Dr. Rai was one of them.  “It was a dream job,” she says.  “What did they offer you as a starting salary?” Ferrer asks.

“The total package was $180, 000,”Rai replies.
Second segment: Was regarding drug cos. – Bristol Myers Squibb.